31 Tips To Boost Your Mental Health

 



1. Track gratitude and achievement with a journal. Include 3 things you were grateful for and 3 things you were able to accomplish each day.

 

2. Start your day with a cup of co­ffee. Coff­ee consumption is linked to lower rates of depression. If you can’t drink coff­ee because of the caff­eine, try another good-for-you drink like green tea. 

 

3. Set up a getaway. It could be camping with friends or a trip to the tropics. The act of planning a vacation and having something to look forward to can boost your overall happiness for up to 8 weeks!

 

4, Work your strengths. Do something you're good at to build self-confidence, then tackle a tougher task. 

 

5. Keep it cool for a good night's sleep. The optimal temperature for sleep is between 60 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

6. "You don't have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step." - Martin Luther King, Jr. Think of something in your life you want to improve, and figure out what you can do to take a step in the right direction.

 

7. Experiment with a new recipe, write a poem, paint or try a Pinterest project. Creative expression and overall well-being are linked.

 

8. Show some love to someone in your life. Close, quality, relationships are key for a happy, healthy life.

 

9. Boost brainpower by treating yourself to a couple pieces of dark chocolate every few days. The flavanoids, caffeine, and theobromine in chocolate are thought to work together to improve alertness and mental skills.

 

10. There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside of you.  -Maya Angelou. If you have personal experience with mental illness or recovery, share on Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr with #mentalillnessfeelslike. Check out what other people are saying here.

 

11. Sometimes, we don't need to add new activities to get more pleasure. We just need to soak up the joy in the ones we've already got. Trying to be optimistic doesn't mean ignoring the uglier sides of life. It just means focusing on the positive as much as possible.

 

12. Feeling anxious?  Take a trip down memory lane and do some coloring for about 20 minutes to help you clear your mind. Pick a design that's geometric and a little complicated for the best effect. Check out hundreds of free printable coloring pages here.

 

13. Take time to laugh. Hang out with a funny friend, watch a comedy or check out cute videos online. Laughter helps reduce anxiety.

 

14. Go off the grid. Leave your smart phone at home for a day and disconnect from constant emails, alerts, and other interruptions. Spend time doing something fun with someone face-to-face.

 

15. Dance around while you do your housework. Not only will you get chores done, but dancing reduces levels of cortisol (the stress hormone), and increases endorphins (the body's "feel-good" chemicals).

 

16. Go ahead and yawn. Studies suggest that yawning helps cool the brain and improves alertness and mental efficiency.

 

17. Relax in a warm bath once a week. Try adding Epsom salts to soothe aches and pains and help boost magnesium levels, which can be depleted by stress.

 

18. Has something been bothering you? Let it all out…on paper. Writing about upsetting experiences can reduce symptoms of depression.

 

19. Spend some time with a furry friend. Time with animals lowers the stress hormone - cortisol, and boosts oxytocin - which stimulates feelings of happiness. If you don’t have a pet, hang out with a friend who does or volunteer at a shelter.

 

20. “What lies before us and what lies behind us are small matters compared to what lies within us. And when you bring what is within out into the world, miracles happen.” - Henry David Thoreau. Practice mindfulness by staying "in the present."  Try these tips

 

21. Be a tourist in your own town. Often times people only explore attractions on trips, but you may be surprised what cool things are in your own backyard.

 

22. Try prepping your lunches or picking out your clothes for the work week. You'll save some time in the mornings and have a sense of control about the week ahead.

 

23. Work some omega-3 fatty acids into your diet–they are linked to decreased rates of depression and schizophrenia among their many benefits. Fish oil supplements work, but eating your omega-3s in foods like wild salmon, flaxseeds or walnuts also helps build healthy gut bacteria.

 

24. Practice forgiveness - even if it's just forgiving that person who cut you off during your commute. People who forgive have better mental health and report being more satisfied with their lives.

 

25. "What appear to be calamities are often the sources of fortune." - Disraeli. Try to find the silver lining in something kind of cruddy that happened recently.

 

26. Feeling stressed? Smile. It may not be the easiest thing to do, but smiling can help to lower your heart rate and calm you down.

 

27. Send a thank you note - not for a material item, but to let someone know why you appreciate them. Written expressions of gratitude are linked to increased happiness.

 

28. Do something with friends and family - have a cookout, go to a park, or play a game. People are 12 times more likely to feel happy on days that they spend 6-7 hours with friends and family.

 

29. Take 30 minutes to go for a walk in nature - it could be a stroll through a park, or a hike in the woods. Research shows that being in nature can increase energy levels, reduce depression and boost well-being.

 

30. Do your best to enjoy 15 minutes of sunshine, and apply sunscreen. Sunlight synthesizes Vitamin D, which experts believe is a mood elevator.

 

31. "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." -Albert Einstein. Try something outside of your comfort zone to make room for adventure and excitement in your life.

Mind-Body Wellness Topic Overview

 


Your mind and body are powerful allies. How you think can affect how you feel. And how you feel can affect your thinking.

An example of this mind-body connection is how your body responds to stress. Constant worry and stress over jobs, finances, or other problems can cause tense muscles, pain, headaches, and stomach problems. It may also lead to high blood pressure or other serious problems.footnote1footnote1




On the other hand, constant pain or a health problem like heart disease can affect your emotions. You might become depressed, anxious, and stressed, which could affect how well you treat, manage, or cope with your illness.

But your mind can have a positive effect on your health, too. Having a positive outlook on life might help you better handle pain or stress and stay healthier than someone who is less hopeful.

How do your thoughts and feelings affect your health?

Your brain produces substances that can improve your health. These substances include endorphins, which are natural painkillers, and gamma globulin, which strengthens your immune system.

Research shows that what your brain produces depends in part on your thoughts, feelings, and expectations. If you're sick but you have hope and a positive attitude and you believe that you'll get better, your brain is likely to produce chemicals that will boost your body's healing power.footnote2

Negative thoughts and emotions can keep your brain from producing some of the chemicals that help your body heal. But this doesn't mean you should blame yourself for getting sick or feeling down about a health problem. Some illnesses are beyond your control. But your thoughts and state of mind are resources you can use to get better.

How does stress affect you?

How you handle stress has an effect on your health.

When you're stressed or anxious, your body reacts as if it is under attack. Your body releases hormones that speed up your heart rate and breathing, increase blood pressure, and make your muscles tense. This physical reaction is called the fight-or-flight stress response.

This stress reaction is good if you need to avoid an accident or other danger. But if you constantly feel stressed, your body's natural fight-or-flight response lasts too long and your blood pressure may stay high. This is bad for your heart. Stress can also affect your emotions. It can make you feel moody, tense, upset, or depressed.

But when you are able to relax your mind and body, your body stops producing the hormones that create stress. The feelings of stress ease, and you return to a state of calm, both physically and mentally.


source:https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/mente#:~:text=You%20might%20become%20depressed%2C%20anxious,someone%20who%20is%20less%20hopeful.

Coping with Depression

When you’re depressed, you can’t just will yourself to “snap out of it.” But these tips can help put you on the road to recovery.




Why is dealing with depression so difficult?

Depression drains your energy, hope, and drive, making it difficult to take the steps that will help you to feel better. Sometimes, just thinking about the things you should do to feel better, like exercising or spending time with friends, can seem exhausting or impossible to put into action.

It’s the Catch-22 of depression recovery: The things that help the most are the things that are the most difficult to do. There is a big difference, however, between something that’s difficult and something that’s impossible. While recovering from depression isn’t quick or easy, you do have more control than you realize—even if your depression is severe and stubbornly persistent. The key is to start small and build from there. You may not have much energy, but by drawing on all your reserves, you should have enough to take a walk around the block or pick up the phone to call a loved one, for example.

Taking the first step is always the hardest. But going for a walk or getting up and dancing to your favorite music, for example, is something you can do right now. And it can substantially boost your mood and energy for several hours—long enough to put a second recovery step into action, such as preparing a mood-boosting meal or arranging to meet an old friend. By taking the following small but positive steps day by day, you’ll soon lift the heavy fog of depression and find yourself feeling happier, healthier, and more hopeful again.

Coping with depression tip 1: Reach out and stay connected

Getting support plays an essential role in overcoming depression. On your own, it can be difficult to maintain a healthy perspective and sustain the effort required to beat depression. At the same time, the very nature of depression makes it difficult to reach out for help. When you’re depressed, the tendency is to withdraw and isolate so that connecting to even close family members and friends can be tough.

You may feel too exhausted to talk, ashamed at your situation, or guilty for neglecting certain relationships. But this is just the depression talking. Staying connected to other people and taking part in social activities will make a world of difference in your mood and outlook. Reaching out is not a sign of weakness and it won’t mean you’re a burden to others. Your loved ones care about you and want to help. And if you don’t feel that you have anyone to turn to, it’s never too late to build new friendships and improve your support network.

How to reach out for depression support

Look for support from people who make you feel safe and cared for. The person you talk to doesn’t have to be able to fix you; they just need to be a good listener—someone who’ll listen attentively and compassionately without being distracted or judging you.

Make face-time a priority. Phone calls, social media, and texting are great ways to stay in touch, but they don’t replace good old-fashioned in-person quality time. The simple act of talking to someone face to face about how you feel can play a big role in relieving depression and keeping it away.

Try to keep up with social activities even if you don’t feel like it. Often when you’re depressed, it feels more comfortable to retreat into your shell, but being around other people will make you feel less depressed.

Find ways to support others. It’s nice to receive support, but research shows you get an even bigger mood boost from providing support yourself. So find ways—both big and small—to help others: volunteer, be a listening ear for a friend, do something nice for somebody.

Care for a pet. While nothing can replace the human connection, pets can bring joy and companionship into your life and help you feel less isolated. Caring for a pet can also get you outside of yourself and give you a sense of being needed—both powerful antidotes to depression.

Join a support group for depression. Being with others dealing with depression can go a long way in reducing your sense of isolation. You can also encourage each other, give and receive advice on how to cope, and share your experiences.

 


Tip 2: Do things that make you feel good

In order to overcome depression, you have to do things that relax and energize you. This includes following a healthy lifestyle, learning how to better manage stress, setting limits on what you’re able to do, and scheduling fun activities into your day.

Do things you enjoy (or used to)

While you can’t force yourself to have fun or experience pleasure, you can push yourself to do things, even when you don’t feel like it. You might be surprised at how much better you feel once you’re out in the world. Even if your depression doesn’t lift immediately, you’ll gradually feel more upbeat and energetic as you make time for fun activities.

Pick up a former hobby or a sport you used to like. Express yourself creatively through music, art, or writing. Go out with friends. Take a day trip to a museum, the mountains, or the ballpark.

Support your health

Aim for eight hours of sleep. Depression typically involves sleep problems; whether you’re sleeping too little or too much, your mood suffers. Get on a better sleep schedule by learning healthy sleep habits.

Keep stress in check. Not only does stress prolong and worsen depression, but it can also trigger it. Figure out all the things in your life that stress you out, such as work overload, money problems, or unsupportive relationships, and find ways to relieve the pressure and regain control.

Practice relaxation techniques. A daily relaxation practice can help relieve symptoms of depression, reduce stress, and boost feelings of joy and well-being. Try yoga, deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation.

When you’re depressed, just getting out of bed can seem like a daunting task, let alone working out! But exercise is a powerful depression fighter—and one of the most important tools in your recovery arsenal. Research shows that regular exercise can be as effective as medication for relieving depression symptoms. It also helps prevent relapse once you’re well.

To get the most benefit, aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. This doesn’t have to be all at once—and it’s okay to start small. A 10-minute walk can improve your mood for two hours.

Exercise is something you can do right now to boost your mood

Your fatigue will improve if you stick with it. Starting to exercise can be difficult when you’re depressed and feeling exhausted. But research shows that your energy levels will improve if you keep with it. Exercise will help you to feel energized and less fatigued, not more.

Find exercises that are continuous and rhythmic. The most benefits for depression come from rhythmic exercise—such as walking, weight training, swimming, martial arts, or dancing—where you move both your arms and legs.

Add a mindfulness element, especially if your depression is rooted in unresolved trauma or fed by obsessive, negative thoughts. Focus on how your body feels as you move—such as the sensation of your feet hitting the ground, or the feeling of the wind on your skin, or the rhythm of your breathing.

Pair up with an exercise partner. Not only does working out with others enable you to spend time socializing, it can also help to keep you motivated. Try joining a running club, taking a water aerobics or dance class, seeking out tennis partners, or enrolling in a soccer or volleyball league.

Take a dog for a walk. If don’t own a dog, you can volunteer to walk homeless dogs for an animal shelter or rescue group. You’ll not only be helping yourself but also be helping to socialize and exercise the dogs, making them more adoptable.

Tip 4: Eat a healthy, depression-fighting diet

What you eat has a direct impact on the way you feel. Reduce your intake of foods that can adversely affect your brain and mood, such as caffeine, alcohol, trans fats, and foods with high levels of chemical preservatives or hormones (such as certain meats).

Don’t skip meals. Going too long between meals can make you feel irritable and tired, so aim to eat something at least every three to four hours.

Minimize sugar and refined carbs. You may crave sugary snacks, baked goods, or comfort foods such as pasta or French fries, but these “feel-good” foods quickly lead to a crash in mood and energy. Aim to cut out as much of these foods as possible.

Boost your B vitamins. Deficiencies in B vitamins such as folic acid and B-12 can trigger depression. To get more, take a B-complex vitamin supplement or eat more citrus fruit, leafy greens, beans, chicken, and eggs.

Boost your mood with foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids play an essential role in stabilizing mood. The best sources are fatty fish such as salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, tuna, and some cold-water fish oil supplements.

Tip 5: Get a daily dose of sunlight

Sunlight can help boost serotonin levels and improve your mood. Whenever possible, get outside during daylight hours and expose yourself to the sun for at least 15 minutes a day. Remove sunglasses (but never stare directly at the sun) and use sunscreen as needed.

  • Take a walk on your lunch break, have your coffee outside, enjoy an al fresco meal, or spend time gardening.
  • Double up on the benefits of sunlight by exercising outside. Try hiking, walking in a local park, or playing golf or tennis with a friend.
  • Increase the amount of natural light in your home and workplace by opening blinds and drapes and sitting near windows.
  • If you live somewhere with little winter sunshine, try using a light therapy box.

Dealing with the winter blues

For some people, the reduced daylight hours of winter lead to a form of depression known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). SAD can make you feel like a completely different person to who you are in the summer: hopeless, sad, tense, or stressed, with no interest in friends or activities you normally love. No matter how hopeless you feel, though, there are plenty of things you can do to keep your mood stable throughout the year.

Tip 6: Challenge negative thinking

Do you feel like you’re powerless or weak? That bad things happen and there’s not much you can do about it? That your situation is hopeless? Depression puts a negative spin on everything, including the way you see yourself and your expectations for the future.

When these types of thoughts overwhelm you, it’s important to remember that this is a symptom of your depression and these irrational, pessimistic attitudes—known as cognitive distortions—aren’t realistic. When you really examine them they don’t hold up. But even so, they can be tough to give up. You can’t break out of this pessimistic mind frame by telling yourself to “just think positive.” Often, it’s part of a lifelong pattern of thinking that’s become so automatic you’re not even completely aware of it. Rather, the trick is to identify the type of negative thoughts that are fueling your depression, and replace them with a more balanced way of thinking.


source:https://www.helpguide.org/articles/depression/coping-with-depression.htm

Treatment -Stomach ulcer

 


If you have a stomach ulcer, your treatment will depend on what caused it. With treatment, most ulcers heal in a month or two.

If your stomach ulcer is caused by a Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) bacterial infection, a course of antibiotics and a medication called a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is recommended.



This is also recommended if it's thought your stomach ulcer is caused by a combination of an H. pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

If your stomach ulcer is just caused by taking NSAIDs, a course of PPI medication is recommended.

Your use of NSAIDs will also be reviewed, and taking an alternative painkiller may be advised.

An alternative type of medication, known as H2-receptor antagonists, is occasionally used instead of PPIs.

Sometimes you may be given additional medication called antacids to relieve your symptoms in the short term.

You may have a repeat gastroscopy after 4 to 6 weeks to check that the ulcer has healed.

There aren't any special lifestyle measures you need to take during treatment, but avoiding stress, alcohol, spicy foods and smoking may reduce your symptoms while your ulcer heals.

Antibiotics

If you have an H. pylori infection, you'll usually be prescribed a course of 2 antibiotics, which each need to be taken twice a day for a week.

The antibiotics most commonly used are amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole.

The side effects of these antibiotics are usually mild and can include:

  • feeling and being sick
  • diarrhoea
  • a metallic taste in your mouth

You'll be retested at least 4 weeks after finishing your antibiotic course has been completed to see whether there are any H. pylori bacteria left in your stomach.

If there are, a further course of eradication therapy using different antibiotics may be given.

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)

PPIs work by reducing the amount of acid your stomach produces, preventing further damage to the ulcer as it heals naturally. They're usually prescribed for 4 to 8 weeks.

Omeprazolepantoprazole and lansoprazole are the PPIs most commonly used to treat stomach ulcers.

Side effects of these are usually mild, but can include:

These should pass once treatment has been completed.

H2-receptor antagonists

Like PPIs, H2-receptor antagonists work by reducing the amount of acid your stomach produces.

Ranitidine is the most widely used H2-receptor antagonist for treating stomach ulcers.

Side effects are uncommon, but may include:

  • diarrhoea
  • headaches
  • dizziness
  • rashes
  • tiredness

Antacids and alginates

All of the above treatments can take several hours before they start to work, so your GP may recommend taking additional antacid medication to neutralise your stomach acid and provide immediate, but short-term, symptom relief.

Some antacids also contain a medicine called an alginate, which produces a protective coating on the lining of your stomach.

These medications are available to buy over the counter at pharmacies. Your pharmacist can advise on which is most suitable for you.

Antacids should be taken when you experience symptoms or when you expect them, such as after meals or at bedtime.

Antacids containing alginates are best taken after meals.

Side effects of both medications are usually minor and can include:

Reviewing NSAID use

If your stomach ulcer has been caused by taking NSAIDs, your GP will want to review your use of them.

You may be advised to use an alternative painkiller not associated with stomach ulcers, such as paracetamol.

Sometimes an alternative type of NSAID that's less likely to cause stomach ulcers, called a COX-2 inhibitor, may be recommended.

If you're taking low-dose aspirin (an NSAID) to reduce your risk of blood clots, your GP will tell you whether you need to continue taking it.

If you do need to keep taking it, long-term treatment with a PPI or H2-receptor antagonist may be prescribed alongside the aspirin to try to prevent further ulcers.

It's important to understand the potential risks associated with continued NSAID use.

You're more likely to develop another stomach ulcer and could experience a serious complication, such as internal bleeding.


source:https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stomach-ulcer/treatment/#:~:text=Proton%20pump%20inhibitors%20(PPIs),used%20to%20treat%20stomach%20ulcers.

Atopic dermatitis (eczema)

 


No lab test is needed to identify atopic dermatitis (eczema). Your doctor will likely make a diagnosis by examining your skin and reviewing your medical history. He or she may also use patch testing or other tests to rule out other skin diseases or identify conditions that accompany your eczema.



If you suspect a certain food caused your child's rash, tell the doctor and ask about identifying potential food allergies.

Treatment

Atopic dermatitis can be persistent. You may need to try various treatments over months or years to control it. And even if treatment is successful, signs and symptoms may return (flare).

It's important to recognize the condition early so that you can start treatment. If regular moisturizing and other self-care steps don't help, your doctor may suggest one or more of the following treatments:

Medications

  • Creams that control itching and help repair the skin. Your doctor may prescribe a corticosteroid cream or ointment. Apply it as directed, after you moisturize. Overuse of this drug may cause side effects, including thinning skin.

    Other creams containing drugs called calcineurin inhibitors — such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel) — affect your immune system. They are used by people older than age 2 to help control the skin reaction. Apply it as directed, after you moisturize. Avoid strong sunlight when using these products.

    These drugs have a black box warning about a potential risk of cancer. But the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology has concluded that the risk-to-benefit ratios of topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus are similar to those of most other conventional treatments of persistent eczema and that the data don't support the use of the black box warning.

  • Drugs to fight infection. Your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic cream if your skin has a bacterial infection, an open sore or cracks. He or she may recommend taking oral antibiotics for a short time to treat an infection.
  • Oral drugs that control inflammation. For more-severe cases, your doctor may prescribe oral corticosteroids — such as prednisone. These drugs are effective but can't be used long term because of potential serious side effects.
  • Newer option for severe eczema. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently approved a new, injectable biologic (monoclonal antibody) called dupilumab (Dupixent). It is used to treat people with severe disease who do not respond well to other treatment options. This is a newer medication, so it doesn't have a long track record in terms of how well it helps people. Studies have shown it to be safe if used as directed. It is very expensive.

Therapies

  • Wet dressings. An effective, intensive treatment for severe atopic dermatitis involves wrapping the affected area with topical corticosteroids and wet bandages. Sometimes this is done in a hospital for people with widespread lesions because it's labor intensive and requires nursing expertise. Or, ask your doctor about learning how to do this technique at home.
  • Light therapy. This treatment is used for people who either don't get better with topical treatments or who rapidly flare again after treatment. The simplest form of light therapy (phototherapy) involves exposing the skin to controlled amounts of natural sunlight. Other forms use artificial ultraviolet A (UVA) and narrow band ultraviolet B (UVB) either alone or with medications.

    Though effective, long-term light therapy has harmful effects, including premature skin aging and an increased risk of skin cancer. For these reasons, phototherapy is less commonly used in young children and not given to infants. Talk with your doctor about the pros and cons of light therapy.

  • Counseling. Talking with a therapist or other counselor may help people who are embarrassed or frustrated by their skin condition.
  • Relaxation, behavior modification and biofeedback. These approaches may help people who scratch habitually.

Infant eczema

Treatment for eczema in babies (infantile eczema) includes:

  • Identifying and avoiding skin irritants
  • Avoiding extreme temperatures
  • Lubricating your baby's skin with bath oils, creams or ointments

Top 16 Ways to Get Rid of Nausea

 


Nausea is that awful, queasy feeling you get in your stomach that makes you feel like you’re going to vomit. It may be triggered by a virus, a digestive condition, pregnancy, or even an unpleasant odor.



Many times, it’s unclear why nausea strikes. Whatever the reason — when it hits, you’ll do almost anything to make it go away.

Here’s a list of 16 ways to get rid of nausea. The list starts with basic remedies to provide fast relief, then moves to those that may take longer to work. Many nausea remedies don’t necessarily cure the condition, but they may help you feel more comfortable.

If your mom ever told you not to lie down after eating, she was on to something. When you lie flat, gastric juices may rise and increase feelings of nausea and overall discomfort, especially if you have acid reflux or GERD.

Crunching your stomach may also worsen nausea since it compresses the area and makes you less comfortable in general. When you’re nauseous, try reclining with your upper body elevated, and move around as little as possible.

There’s a reason you see carsick people with their heads practically hanging out of the car window. Fresh air eases nausea symptoms in many people, although it’s not clear why. It may get rid of sickening odors, or simply help you focus on something other than the nausea.

Try sitting in front of a fan or window at the first sign of nausea, especially if you’re overheated.

A soothing, cool compress placed on the back of the neck may help ease nausea. When nausea occurs, your body temperature may increase.

Placing a cool compress on the back of your neck for several minutes can be soothing. It also helps decrease your body temperature which, if high, may cause nausea.

Acupressure is an alternative medicine therapy that applies pressure to specific areas on the body to ease symptoms. The pressure point for nausea is on your inner wrist, about two and a half inches down, in between two large tendons. To ease nausea, press on this pressure point in a circular motion for a few minutes.

Meditation, the practice of focusing and calming the mind, may help relieve nausea. It’s a type of relaxation technique that may be especially beneficial for nausea caused by stress and anxiety.

Deep breathing is a meditation technique. But you can also do it on your own to quell stress-related nausea. Breathe in slowly through your nose, hold your breath for three seconds, and slowly breathe out. Repeat several times until nausea subsides.

Sometimes, curing nausea is simply mind over matter. The more you dwell on your nausea, the more nauseous you’re likely to feel.

The next time nausea attacks, distract yourself by reading a book or watching television. If motion doesn’t make you feel worse, do some light housework or play a game with your kids — anything to get your mind off how you feel.

If you’re at work, take several deep breaths, and attack that pile of paperwork on your desk you’ve been ignoring for days. But most of all, don’t be a martyr at work if your nausea persists. You may have the dreaded, highly contagious “stomach bug.”

If you can’t eat or drink due to nausea, dehydration may occur. Nausea is also a symptom of dehydration, yet drinking too much may worsen nausea by making your stomach feel uncomfortably full.

When you feel queasy, sip fluids throughout the day. If straight water turns your stomach, try drinking decaf tea, or water with fresh fruit slices.

Chamomile tea is a popular folk remedy for nausea. It has a sedative effect that may help you sleep when you’re nauseous. It may also ease anxiety.

Chamomile tea bags are available at most grocery stores, natural health stores, and online. Make your own chamomile tea by pouring one cup boiling water over a tablespoon of dried or fresh chamomile flowers. Steep for at least five minutes, and strain.

Lemons contain citric acid, a naturally-occurring compound thought to aid digestion and soothe the stomach. Try adding freshly-squeezed lemon juice to water and sip throughout the day.

If nausea is due to constipation, drinking warm water with lemon juice may stimulate your bowels. Go easy, though. Ingesting too much lemon juice in a brief period may make nausea worse.

The scent of lemons may also ease nausea. According to a 2014 studyTrusted Source, inhaling lemon essential oil can help reduce nausea and vomiting in pregnant women. If you don’t have lemon essential oil on hand, simply cut a fresh lemon in half and breathe the scent in.

Ginger is arguably the most popular home remedy for nausea. According to a 2012 review, ginger has antiemetic abilities, although more research is still needed.

To help nausea, eat a small piece of fresh or candied ginger. You can also drink ginger tea, which you’ll find in grocery stores, natural health stores, and online.

Make your own ginger tea by pouring one cup boiling water over a one-inch piece of peeled, fresh, ginger root. Steep for at least five minutes, strain if you want, and enjoy.

According to a 2013 studyTrusted Source, peppermint oil was found to be a safe and effective way to combat nausea due to chemotherapy treatment. You can take peppermint capsules, or drink peppermint tea to experience these benefits.

Look for peppermint tea at grocery and natural health stores, or online. Or make your own by pouring one cup boiling water over a heaping teaspoon of fresh peppermint leaves. Steep for at least five minutes, and strain to preference.

Inhaling peppermint essential oil or fresh peppermint leaves may also ease nausea after anesthesia, according to a 2011 study.

There’s an old wives’ tale that drinking carbonated beverages such as ginger ale or cola helps tame tummy troubles. The opposite is often true.

Carbonated drinks may cause bloating and worsen acid reflux and GERD, all of which may cause nausea. In addition, most fizzy beverages are loaded with sugar, which may also make you queasier.

If you must drink a fizzy drink, let it go flat or dilute it with water before drinking

Following a bland diet may help nausea from worsening or prevent you from vomiting. The most common recommended diet for recovering from nausea is the BRAT diet — bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast.

You can also eat small amounts of:

  • saltines
  • plain pasta or noodles
  • plain baked or mashed potatoes
  • scrambled eggs
  • hard-boiled eggs

Avoid fried foods, dairy products like cheese and milk, meat, and foods high in fiber until nausea subsides.

Nausea medications are called antiemetics. When nausea is severe, you may need an OTC medication to help calm and soothe the stomach.

Some options are:

If you’re pregnant, don’t take any OTC medications without consulting your doctor first.

In 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved DiclegisTrusted Source, a combination of vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine) and the antihistamine doxylamine, as a treatment for pregnancy-related nausea.

Vitamin B-6 on its own has had mixed results for treating nausea. The typical dose is between 30 to 100 milligrams daily, in 1 to 3 divided doses for up to 3 weeks.

Too much vitamin B-6 may worsen nausea, however. It may also cause serious side effects, such as:

  • abnormal heart rhythm
  • tingling
  • decreased muscle tone

For this reason, only take Diclegis or vitamin B-6 for nausea under your doctor’s supervision.

It’s always important to discuss all medications with your doctor while pregnant to avoid those that may interact negatively with you or your child. Your doctor may recommend other approaches first, as most nausea in pregnancy subsides by the fourth month, or second trimester.

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil comes from an active compound in cannabis. CBD oil doesn’t contain THC, the main cannabinoid in cannabis that alters mental state.

Research is on-going and more is still needed, however, some studies have shown promising results. One studyTrusted Source from 2012 on rats suggests that CBD produces anti-nausea effects indirectly in the brain.

CBD oil is available in many forms, including:

  • liquids
  • pastes
  • capsules
  • vapes
  • edibles
  • sprays

Dosing isn’t regulated and recommendations vary, so read the instructions on the package carefully and check with a medical professional before use. Only use medical-grade CBD oil to treat nausea.

CBD oil isn’t legal in every state, so be sure to check your state’s laws before purchasing or using it, and buy from a reputable source. Some states may allow CBD only with a doctor’s prescription.

When other symptoms accompany nausea, it may be serious. For instance, nausea with chest pain is a classic sign of a heart attack. Nausea with a severe headache or severe dizziness may indicate a neurological issue.

See your doctor if episodes of nausea last more than one month, or you have nausea and unexplained weight loss.

Get emergency help if you have nausea and:

Dehydration and nausea often go together. Get prompt medical attention if you have nausea and other symptoms of dehydration such as: