How Important Is Sleep?


If you are familiar with the Bible account on creation, you will know that God created both day and night. Moving creatures were meant to rest at night. Although there are few creatures that stay awake at night and search for food, humans uses the night to sleep. Despite this wonderful provision, many people hardly utilize the night for a restful sleep how much more so for a short nap at daytime. We live in a world of economic pressure where everyone is working so hard to making a living. As regard this situation, many income earners find it so hard to get at least seven hours sleep per night. Apart from work, some others find it hard getting sleep as a result of sleep disorders. So many youths today deny themselves of needed sleep in the name of educational pursuit. They spend countless hours of sleepless night reading for an examination, while others stay awake watching late night movies.
Sleeping
Image courtesy of Stoonn at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The importance of sleep can never be over emphasized. Sleep is essential to the human body as does both food and exercise. During sleep the body is in a state of inactivity but the brain is active doing some kind of self-repair. We may not fully grasp what sleep does for us but it is highly beneficial. Sleep does improve memory. When trying to study or learn something new, try sleeping and when you wake up, embark on that task. You will find it much easier because at that time the mind has been on rest. It will be more easier to assimilate.

Although having sufficient sleep won't give us absolute health, but it can improve our well-being. Sleep will boost your immunity and lower your risk of developing health problems such as diabetes, heart diseases, obesity and high blood pressure.

The dire consequences of robbing oneself of much-needed sleep cannot be escaped. When you deny yourself of healthful sleep, you weaken your immune system. It is during sleep that the body produces T cells responsible for fighting against disease-causing organisms. When much-needed sleep is sacrificed for other activities the body become susceptible to various infections and health problems. Sleep is needed for our overall well-being. Sleep deprivation can affect your academic and secular work. It is not uncommon these days to hear of highway drivers fall asleep while driving. This has occasionally led to serious accidents. At workplace, your productivity may decline because of fatigue since you have deprived the body of healthful sleep. Scientist tell us that, on average, human require about eight hours of sleep per night. So how much sleep do you get every night?

Recommended: 9 Simple and Effective Tips on How to Sleep Better 

10 comments:

  1. I'm even thinking of quitting my job. It so stressful that I'm so in debt to sleep. Sleep is really important even than food. You can live for days without food but without sleep...it death! Thanks for this information.

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  2. Sleep is important and I used to love sleeping.

    I have been sleeping between 5 and 6 hours a night. I work full time, am a church leader, have two young children, run a blog (only post once a week), started a sideline business.

    I am working hard now in order to be more comfortable later. It is not guaranteed but more likely than if I stay content working 9am-5pm.

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  3. Oh how much I hate to be deprived of sleep! The world that we live in means that there is constant pressure upon us -we need to survive somehow. My job could be stressful and not getting enough sleep makes me irritable and in the past, I took it out on my little sister.

    These days no matter how stressed I am, I ensure that I get at least 7 hours of proper sleep. Also I ensure that I maintain a healthy diet and i refuse to be distracted. As soon as my head hits the pillow..............

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  4. Not enough sleep is something I'm constantly battling with. I don't know whether it's because I'm getting older and apparently you don't need as much sleep then or what the problem is but I seldom get more that 4 hours sleep at a stretch. I will go back in the afternoon and grab a few more hours but it's just not the same. But it is not something you can force so I just go with it.

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  5. I agree with this totally, but I admit I do not get sleep. I work two jobs, start out a 7 am, get done at 5, then to the 2nd one until 1 am. I know it affects me, but sometimes you cannot avoid not getting enough sleep.

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  6. I am at my best when I get 7 hours of sleep, better with 8, but that doesn't always happen. I think that most people do not get enough sleep for a variety of reasons, different at each/stage in life. Too-busy lives and stress count for a good part of it. Now that I am older, I find that I and many of my friends have interrupted sleep patterns.This is not as upsetting to me as it once was because I now often have the luxury of sleeping in after going back to bed if I've been up for a while in the night. Still not as good as getting a solid night's sleep.

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  7. I believe the night sleep is more beneficial than afternoon nap. It just reminded me of the time I visited a friend in a state that works night shift..Definitely missing those ingredients that you mentioned above that does for the body...But it is quite unfortunate that many have to deprive themselves of the necessary amount of sleep just to meet up for their daily routine job.

    Nice one up there

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  8. No wonder, I need more sleep man

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  9. When we sleep we go through 5 stages of sleep: stages 1 through 4, called non-rem stages, and the 5th stage called REM sleep. REM is an acronym for rapid eye movement and describes our eyes' activity during this stage of sleep. It is during rapid eye movement sleep that our bodies are thought to restore themselves and it is said that without this stage of sleep, we would die. This is thought to be the case because if we starve ourselves of REM sleep, our brain sends a signal forcing our bodies to jump into REM a lot quicker the next time we lay down for sleep. This is the brain's way of trying to make up for the lost REM the last time around - a type of self-preservation.

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    ReplyDelete

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